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You occupy an important role in preventing lead poisoning in children. Parents look to you for your advice, your expertise and most importantly, your help in safeguarding their home and their family.

FACT 1: Lead paint poisoning affects over one million children today.
FACT 2: Buildings built before 1978 are much more likely to have lead-based paint. It is urgent that you take every step to protect those in your care.






What to ask your patients
Here are some questions to ask your patients regarding a child's environmental history:

Paint and soil exposure
What is the age and general condition of the residence? Is there evidence of chewed or peeling paint on woodwork, furniture, or toys?
How long has the family lived at that residence? Have there been recent renovations or repairs in the house? Are there other sites where the child spends significant amounts of time?
What is the character of indoor play areas?
Do outdoor play areas contain bare soil that may be contaminated?
How does the family attempt to control dust/dirt?

Relevant behavioral characteristics of the child
To what degree does the child exhibit hand-to-mouth activity?
Does the child exhibit pica (eating things that are not food, such as dirt)?
Are the child's hands washed before meals and snacks?
What are the exposures to and behaviors of household members?
What are the occupations of adult household members?
What are the hobbies of household members? (Fishing, working with ceramics or stained glass, and hunting are examples of hobbies that involve risk for lead exposure).
Are painted materials or unusual materials burned in household fireplaces?

Miscellaneous questions
Does the home contain vinyl mini-blinds made overseas and purchased before 1997?
Does the child receive or have access to imported food, cosmetics, or folk remedies?
Is food prepared or stored in imported pottery or metal vessels?
Educate yourself
Links to Sites for Medical Professionals
FIND: MEDICAID SCREENING PROGRAM FOR LEAD TOXICITY click icon
FIND: CDC VIDEO TRAINING FOR COLLECTING AND HANDLING BLOOD LEAD SAMPLE click icon
GET: EPA/HEAD START TIPS FOR HEALTH SPECIALISTS ON LEAD POISONING PREVENTION pdf icon
FIND: NATIONAL BUSINESS GROUP ON HEALTH (NBGH) HEALTH CARE/INSURANCE SYSTEM GUIDELINES click icon

The American Academy of Pediatrics has published several papers on childhood lead exposure, screening and treatment
 
FIND: LEAD EXPOSURE IN CHILDREN: PREVENTION, DETECTION AND MANAGEMENT click icon
GET: SCREENING FOR ELEVATED BLOOD LEAD LEVELS pdf icon
GET: TREATMENT GUIDELINES FOR LEAD EXPOSURE IN CHILDREN pdf icon


Training
These training materials provide information for public health and housing practitioners in the assessment and treatment of housing-related health hazards.
FIND: LEAD POISONING PREVENTION TRAINING CENTER click icon
FIND: NATIONAL CENTER FOR HEALTHY HOUSING TRAINING click icon
FIND: CASE STUDIES IN ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE- LEAD TOXICITY click icon

Case Studies and Reports
These educational case study documents are designed to increase your knowledge of hazardous substances in the environment and to promote the adoption of medical practices that aid in the evaluation and care of potentially exposed patients.
FIND: LEAD EXPOSURE CASE STUDIES click icon
FIND: LEAD TOXICOLOGY REPORTS click icon
FIND: DATA AND SURVEILLANCE REPORTS click icon

Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units
The Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics (AOEC) at CDC and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have established a network of Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Units (PEHSU). The PEHSU's have been developed to provide education and consultation for health professionals, public health professionals and others about the topic of children's environmental health.
Educate your patients
GET: MEDICAL PROFESSIONAL GUIDE click icon


How to keep your school or child care facility lead-safe
Schools and child care facilities that were built before 1978 are likely to contain lead-based paint. If your school was built before 1978, make sure to follow these simple steps:
Have your students wash their hands before snack and lunch, and after recess. Head Start Staff Talking Points
Promote a healthy diet to your class. Children with healthy diets absorb less lead.
Perform visual examinations of every classroom for deteriorating paint.
Make sure all arts and crafts supplies are lead-free.
Supply a rough mat at the entrance of your classroom door for kids to wipe their feet before entering the classroom so they don't track in soil that could contain lead. Read about entry mat systems to prevent the spread of pollutants in buildings.
If your school is undergoing renovations:
Ask your contractor for Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers, and Schools and distribute it to parents.
Make sure the building's contractor is lead-safe certified.
Keep the children out of the work area.
Keep the work area contained.
Ask your contractor to verify proper clean up procedures.
Make sure your principal and school board are aware of and comply with EPA's lead-safe work practice requirements by having only certified firms do repair work in your school! These lead-safe work practices are designed to protect teachers and students. Find out more information on EPA's Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting Program rule.
Check playground structures. Certain older playground structures were coated with lead-based paint. Make sure your school or childcare facility's play environment is safe, and learn about lead in playground structures.


Guidelines for schools
EPA's Healthy School Environments web site designed to provide one-stop access to the many programs and resources available to help prevent and resolve environmental issues in schools.
GET: Educator/Caregiver Guide click icon


Why you should get certified
After April 22, 2010, contractors performing work that disturbs lead-based paint without proper certification and training could face tens of thousands of dollars in fines. Plus you put the health of yourself, your workers and your customers at risk, which could result in lawsuits. These costs far outweigh the price of becoming certified. Plus, it's the right thing to do.

Lead paint is an invisible danger, and can cause adverse health effects at lower levels of exposure (high blood pressure, headaches, feeling tired, etc.). Here are the facts about lead paint poisoning that everyone should know:
Over one million kids each year are affected by lead paint poisoning with some level of irreversible damage such as lower intelligence, learning disabilities, and behavior issues.
Adults exposed to lead paint can suffer from high blood pressure and hypertension and lead exposure at higher levels can cause headaches, dizziness, and fatigue. Even minor levels of exposure to lead paint can harm adults.
It's not just lead paint chips that poison. An entire home can be contaminated from only a small amount of lead dust that is easily inhaled by workers and or ingested by young children living there.
You cannot tell that you are being poisoned. Once the damage is done, it can affect you throughout your life.
Recent research shows that many new cases can be directly linked to home renovations where the work environment was inadequately contained.

Take a one-day Renovation, Repair and Painting Rules Course. The price for this course is set by private EPA-accredited trainers. To find an accredited trainer near you, click here.


How to protect yourself
Completing a Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule Course taught by EPA-accredited trainers will give you in-depth knowledge to minimize the risk of lead poisoning during the renovation of homes and buildings built before 1978. Do it to protect yourself, your workers and your customers. To find a certified trainer near you, click here
Here is an overview of some of the simple safety practices you will learn:
How to contain the work area. The area should be contained so that dust and debris do not escape. Warning signs should be posted and heavy-duty plastic and tape should be used to delineate the area being worked in, including doors and HVAC vents.
How to minimize dust. Some methods of paint removal generate large amounts of lead-contaminated dust and vapors and should not be used. These dangerous methods include open flame burning or torching, sanding, grinding, planing, needle gunning, or blasting with power tools without a HEPA shroud.
How to clean up thoroughly every day and do a special clean up at the end of the job. Use a HEPA vacuum to clean up dust and debris on all surfaces and wet mop with plenty of rinse water and cleaning verification. All of these procedures are taught in the training course.
The EPA website has a number of additional resources that you can download and print for free.
Learn all the details on how to get your company Lead-Safe Certified.
GET: Renovator/Contractor Guide pdf icon


How to protect your tenants
As a landlord, you can protect your tenants by keeping your property free of lead paint hazards.

Most buildings built before 1978 have some lead paint. Properties built before 1960 contain the most lead paint. Lead paint can be present on any painted surface, but it is most often found on windows, trim, doors, railings, columns, porches and outside walls. Surfaces that have been repainted may have layers of lead paint underneath. A lead inspection can tell you where lead paint is located. Find Help.

Peeling or damaged paint is dangerous. Lead dust can be released from peeling or damaged paint or by sanding or scraping paint in older homes. Lead dust settles on floors, window sills and other surfaces where it can get into children's toys or hands and their mouths. Lead paint in good condition is usually not a problem.
Protect your tenants:
Keep paint in good shape.
Watch out for lead dust when you repair, repaint or renovate.
Make lead safety a habit. Most homes built before 1978 contain lead paint which, if not managed properly, can endanger young children.
Provide tenants with the EPA's lead hazard information pamphlet, as required by EPA's Lead Renovtion, Repair and Painting rule (RRPrule).
GET: Landlord/Property Owner Guide pdf icon

If you are renovating or doing building repair:

If you or your employees conduct renovation or repair activities in a pre-1978 residential building, you:
Are legally required to be EPA-certified and follow simple lead-safe work practices to contain the work area, minimize dust, and clean up thoroughly. Submit your application to EPA to become a Lead-Safe Certified Firm.
Must hire atleast one member of your staff trained and certified in lead-safe work practices. Find a list of accredited trainers here.
Renovate Right: Important Lead Hazard Information for Families, Child Care Providers, and Schools.
Document your compliance with the pre-renovation notice with this Pre-Renovation Disclosure Form
Following these simple steps will prevent lead-based paint exposure and help you avoid liability.
If you contract out renovations and repairs for your building, ensure you use and EPA-certified contractor.
Find a list of EPA-certified contractors in your area.


Your responsibility to your tenants
The Lead Disclosure Rule requires owners to give tenants a brochure and to provide test results and standard warning language in leases. This must be done before a new tenant signs a lease and before an existing tenant renews a lease for properties built before 1978. Call 1-800-424-LEAD for free copies of the brochure, Protect Your Family From Lead in Your Home, the standard warning language and other information about the Lead Disclosure Rule.

GET: Landlord/Property Owner Guide pdf icon